With the Classic beta now out it seems every related article somehow manages to spark the eternal war of "Vanilla was the best WoW sucks now" and "lol nostalgia goggles, Vanilla sucked, enjoy your two weeks of Classic". I have to say, even though I understand the principles behind the battle and the reasons people behave and talk this way... I actually REALLY don't get it on a deeper level.

The original World of Warcraft was released in 2004, and World of Warcraft Classic aims to recreate the state of the MMORPG before its first expansion, The Burning Crusade, was rolled out in January 2007. Previously, players looking for a “vanilla” version of the game were only able to experience it on custom servers such as Nostalrius, which Blizzard shut down in 2016 to protect its intellectual property.

The quality of captured wild pets is random. As of patch 5.1, upon entering a battle the Pet Battle UI shows the quality of a wild pet (idicated by a color-coded border around its icon). If you're farming a specific quality, if you forfeit the match your team will incur a small damage penalty (roughly 10%). There is no accurate way to determine a pet's quality prior to the start of a battle.
All of this is keeping with the spirit of vanilla, which I think is more important than that a specific number be 11 instead of 12. And it would help to "resize the swing" by making the game harder to the more experienced community, and forcing people to re-discover the game rather than simply looking up whatever they want to know on a spreadsheet somewhere.

Most people who have spent years playing massively multiplayer online games will tell you that there's something special about the first one you played, too—and WoW was the first for many people. You can become so swept up in the uniqueness of your first experience that you overlook many flaws. It's likely many look at WoW Classic with rose-colored glasses, just as many simply forgot which features were added when. And some of today's WoW players may be too young to have even played vanilla WoW as it once was.

No he's just not paying attention. The wanted quests are built into both the leveling guides and the "Zandalar Forever" achievement guide. They aren't in the rep guide because they are not repeatable and by the time you hit max level they should be done. You'll also notice the rep guide doesn't contain every single possible completable quest that rewards rep. It is designed to focus on repeatable objectives, world quests, large quest lines, and missions.


We’ll be performing our first stress test for WoW Classic on Wednesday, May 22, from 4–6pm PDT. During this time, the closed beta test realm will be unavailable. Those who are currently in the beta test will only be able to login to the stress test realm during this time and beta testers can participate using their existing installation. We’ll also be adding a significant number of players to the stress test from the pool of people who have already opted in for the beta but have not yet been selected.

Much like an encounter with a wild pet team, PVP Pet Battles are turn-based. However, unlike the PVE version, the PVP combat system is timed and any ability for each round must be chosen within that time limit otherwise it will assume you have passed a turn. A time penalty is applied if you take more than 15 seconds to choose an action, resulting in progressively shorter round timers for you.


Since the same client is used for both our stress test users and our normal beta users, the name in the Battle.net App has changed to “Beta & Stress Test: WoW Classic.” If you’ve been selected to participate in the stress test, you’ll see this option appear in the Region/Account drop down menu so you can download and install the WoW Classic client in advance, but you’ll only be able to see the stress test realm when it becomes available.
World of Warcraft Classic is currently in beta, which means some players are getting a chance to experience a much older version of the MMO ahead of its release. WoW Classic is based on how WoW played in August 2006, back around update 1.12. Back then, things were different. Tauren hitboxes were much larger, sitting could cause certain combat effects to not trigger and completed quests were marked with dots and not question marks. Strange days.
Other methods have been discussed. For example, mods could be crippled. DBM didn't exist back then, and the other boss that did that I don't remember the name of, didn't do as much back then as DBM does now. If our goal is to recreate the experience as it was, then obviously not having DBM would be a reasonable way to accomplish that. DBM simply existing, makes the game today easier than it was. So disallow it. Again, this is completely consistent with the spirit of vanilla. Remember one-button-decursing? That was nerfed. They crippled the capabilities of the modding API to disallow that because it made the game too easy. So what if they cripple it a little bit more to once again make the game less easy?
I have tried it a few times. It's good if you're new to the game. Otherwise not so much. I found I leveled slower by using it, as it's suggesting to take the longest possible route usually. Basically following roads everytime, when you could take an easy shortcut. Especially if the shortcut involves a bit of fall damage, it's out of question. The "go here" spots don't also update if you take a shortcut, and then the waypoint arrow points to wrong direction. But perhaps it has been updated since then.
Keep in mind that these quests are optional, and are not necessary to continue leveling and capturing companions. They are also account-wide, so if you complete the quest chain on one character, you will not be able to complete it again on another. However, any progress that you've made will be saved and you can pick up where you left off in the quest chain on another character. The dailies that you've unlocked will also be accessible by all your toons.
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