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Old vanilla WoW footage and database information suggests durotar tigers should do 6-9 damage before mitigation. There is current beta footage of durotar tigers doing a completely normal amount of damage (5-7) to one person (tips, warrior), as we would expect. There is also beta footage of durotar tigers doing 1-3 damage to one person (joana, hunter). There has yet to be a compelling explanation for the discrepancy. However, most other information and first hand accounts report most mobs doing the amount of damage we would expect, so this appears to be an outlier.
Kaivax, a WoW forum community manager, revealed that WoW Classic's class design, battleground mechanics and stats on existing items will be set to their 1.12 state, despite the game releasing content that expands beyond that. This removes "progressive itemization," so if the stats on a specific piece of equipment was changed during the original updates, that won't take effect in this version.
In order to save up gold quickly, you must be mindful of your character’s professions. According to various sources, the most profitable profession back in the day used to be herbalism. Mining and skinning are right up there as well. Gathering-oriented professions have an advantage compared to the crafting ones in the early levels because gathering doesn’t require you to spend gold in order to make some coins. You can find plenty of herbs to collect, ores to mine and beasts to skin, all while you’re levelling. Everything you manage to gather can then be sold in the auction house fairly quickly.
World of Warcraft (also known as WoW) players have highly requested the classic version of their favourite game. As with any game, changes and major updates are added over the years. Since August 2006, many changes to the game have not been received well: such as trivialising levelling up. The level cap will drop from 120 to 60, but contrary to how that sounds, it will be a far more grindy journey of fun and progress. The current developers have made levelling up very fast in comparison to the classic days, purely to focus on end-game content and raiding which many people do not enjoy. Prior to these changes, many people enjoyed the games for years whilst not hitting max level, something never seen in the modern edition of World of Warcraft. The levelling process was a journey, having fun with professions and the grind that is no longer found. Of course, there are countless other changes that will be reverted, as you might expect when comparing something from 2006 to 2019.
Why Skinning? Skinning is incredibly easy to level up while you are leveling your character. The leather that you skin will almost always sell on the Auction House (albeit not for much, but hey– it’s free gold!). Even if you don’t want to take the effort to sell the skins on the Auction House, you can simply vendor them for a significant amount of extra gold.
In order to save up gold quickly, you must be mindful of your character’s professions. According to various sources, the most profitable profession back in the day used to be herbalism. Mining and skinning are right up there as well. Gathering-oriented professions have an advantage compared to the crafting ones in the early levels because gathering doesn’t require you to spend gold in order to make some coins. You can find plenty of herbs to collect, ores to mine and beasts to skin, all while you’re levelling. Everything you manage to gather can then be sold in the auction house fairly quickly.
The argument for this is simple: what makes classic WoW great to one player might be different from what makes it great for another. And who are Blizzard's designers to say which old features were just good or bad design for each player? It's an approach that shows Blizzard believes (at least to some degree) that WoW doesn't just belong to its creators but to its fans. That struggle between authorial intent or game design orthodoxy and "the player is always right" is at the heart of many of gaming's big contemporary controversies. But so far, Blizzard seems committed to its plan with regard to WoW Classic.
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